Scottish Government Dodges All 5G Responsibility, Including Public Health

The Scottish Government admitted that 5G safety will not be tested in Scotland; nor apparently will it anywhere else in the UK.

This admission came in a response I received today to a Freedom of Information request about 5G filed last month.

In responding to 10 questions set out in the FOIA document – see the full exchange below – the Scottish Government distanced itself from absolutely any part in the current piloting of 5G in Edinburgh and Glasgow and eventual rollout across the country.

Scotland, like the UK and other Western countries, seems happy to leave public safety in corporate hands.

No 5G testing at all in Scotland and probably Britain

Question 8 on the 5G FOIA request read: “What health standards are being applied to the 5G pilots and eventual rollout in Scotland? When were they devised and by whom?”

Most startlingly, the opening words of the Scottish Government’s answer to this were:

“The Scottish Government receives evidence-based advice on the health impacts of exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from Public Health England (PHE). They have the expertise to assess the scientific literature available on this topic, and keep it under review. This advice is not specific [to] these 5G trials and pertains to EMF more widely.”

The Public Health England advice that Scotland will rely on “is not specific [to] these 5G trials and pertains to EMF more widely”?

Right there is the admission that 5G safety is not being tested in Scotland nor, apparently, anywhere else in the UK

Indeed, PHE merely observes World Health Organisation-recognised safety guidelines that are themselves increasingly exposed by independent experts as being too outdated and inadequate for existing wireless technology let alone high-powered 5G.

No one is doing safety testing at all when it comes to 5G and public health

Full text of the FOIA exchange:

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Our ref: FoI/19/00114
05 February 2019

REQUEST UNDER THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION (SCOTLAND) ACT 2002 (FOISA)

Thank you for your request dated 09 January 2018 under the Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002 (FOISA).

Your request

You requested details relating to 5G pilot projects in Edinburgh and Glasgow and the subsequent rollout of 5G in Scotland.

Response to your request

While our aim is to provide information whenever possible, in this instance the Scottish Government does not have some of the information you have requested. The reasons why we don’t have the information are explained in the responses to your questions in the Annex to this letter.

Your right to request a review

If you are unhappy with this response to your FOI request, you may ask us to carry out an internal review of the response, by writing to Colin Cook, Director Digital (c/o The Scottish Government, Victoria Quay, Edinburgh EH6 6QQ or director.digital@gov.scot). Your review request should explain why you are dissatisfied with this response, and should be made within 40 working days from the date when you received this letter. We will complete the review and tell you the result, within 20 working days from the date when we receive your review request.

If you are not satisfied with the result of the review, you then have the right to appeal to the Scottish Information Commissioner. More detailed information on your appeal rights is available on the Commissioner’s website at: http://www.itspublicknowledge. info/YourRights/ Unhappywiththeresponse/ Appealingto Commissioner.aspx.

I hope this reply is helpful.

Digital Connectivity Policy Team

Annex A – response to Questions 1-10

1. Which Scottish cities will be involved in the pilot and what dates are scheduled for each to commence? When is the final rollout process anticipated to start and what are the criteria for deciding on a pilot’s success or failure?

The Scottish Government does not hold this information. These trials of 5G technology in Scotland are being led commercially by mobile network operators as part of their plans to rollout services. Telecoms is reserved to the UK Parliament and, as such, the Scottish Government has no formal delivery or oversight role in relation to 5G pilots or rollout.

2. How much total money is being invested in the pilots and how much will be invested in the eventual rollout in Scotland?

The Scottish Government does not hold this information. The Scottish Government is not funding any of these trials.

3. How much public money is being spent on the 5G pilots in Scotland?

We understand that these trials are commercially funded.

4. How much public money is likely to be spent on the eventual 5G rollout across Scotland?

The Scottish Government does not hold this information. The Scottish Government has not currently committed any funding towards 5G rollout.

5. How much private money is being invested in the 5G pilots and the eventual rollout in Scotland?

The Scottish Government does not hold this information.

6. Which commercial companies are taking part in the pilots and the eventual rollout in Scotland?

The Scottish Government understands that EE and Vodafone have publicly stated their intent to deploy 5G in Scotland.

7. What infrastructure (e.g., cell towers and small cell units) will be put in place to facilitate the 5G pilots in Scotland? Where will they be sited and will there be a planning application process required?

The Scottish Government does not hold information relating to the equipment requirements and locations pertaining to these trials. Planning applications are considered by local authorities.

8. What health standards are being applied to the 5G pilots and eventual rollout in Scotland? When were they devised and by whom?

The Scottish Government receives evidence-based advice on the health impacts of exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from Public Health England (PHE). They have the expertise to assess the scientific literature available on this topic, and keep it under review. This advice is not specific these 5G trials and pertains to EMF more widely.

Limits for exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have been established in guidelines produced by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The guidelines are formally recognised by the World Health Organisation and underpin health protection policies at UK and European levels.

Monitoring in the UK has continually shown that exposure of the general public to radio waves is well within the levels set out in the ICNIRP guidelines.

A significant amount of research has been carried out both nationally and internationally to address concerns over rapidly proliferating wireless technologies. The current evidence suggests that overall exposure to radio waves when 5G is added to the existing network or in a new area, is expected to remain low relative to guidelines and as such there should be no consequence for public health.

The Scottish Government will continue to monitor the issue via advice from specialists at PHE.

9. Which department of the Scottish Government is taking the lead in 5G piloting and eventual rollout?

The Scottish Government is not involved in these 5G pilots.

10. How will people be notified when 5G is being piloted in their area and rolled out in Scotland?

This information is not held by the Scottish Government. The Scottish Government is not involved in the rollout of these 5G pilots, which are commercially led.

British Government FOIA request

The same 10 questions were put to the UK government and a reply is expected later this week.

Updates as and when …

So Watch This Space! 😎

Meanwhile, listen to this psychopathic babble:

 

 

(Lisa Michalek for uploading this clip to Youtube)